Move-Up vs. Second Home: Which One Is Right For You?

The pandemic has changed the way many of us live, work, and attend school—and those changes have impacted our priorities when it comes to choosing a home.

According to a recent survey by The Harris Poll, 75% of respondents who have begun working remotely would like to continue doing so—and 66% would consider moving if they no longer had to commute as often. Some of the top reasons were to gain a dedicated office space (31%), a larger home (30%), and more rooms overall (29%).1 

And now that virtual school has become a reality for many families, that need for additional space has only intensified. A growing number of buyers are choosing homes further from town as they seek out more room and less congestion. In fact, a recent survey found that nearly 40% of urban dwellers had considered leaving the city because of the COVID-19 outbreak.2

But not everyone is permanently sold on suburban or rural life. Instead, some are choosing to purchase a second home as a co-primary residence or frequent getaway. Without the requirements of a five-day commute, many homeowners feel less tethered to their primary residence and are eager for a change of scenery after spending so much time at home.

If you’re feeling cramped in your current space, you’ve probably considered a move. But what type of home would suit you best: a move-up home or a second home? Let’s explore each option to help you determine which one is right for you.

WHY CHOOSE A MOVE-UP HOME?

A move-up home is typically a larger or nicer home. It’s a great choice for families or individuals who simply need more space, a better location, or want features their current home doesn’t offer—like an inground pool, a different floor plan, or a dedicated home office. 

Most move-up buyers choose to sell their current home and use the proceeds as a downpayment on their next one. If you’re struggling with a lack of functional or outdoor space in your current home, a move-up home can greatly improve your everyday life. And with mortgage rates at their lowest level in history, you may be surprised how much home you can afford to buy without increasing your monthly payment.3,4

To learn more about mortgage rates, contact us for a free copy of our recent report!
“Lowest Mortgage Rates in History: What It Means for Homeowners and Buyers”

One major benefit of choosing a move-up home is that you can typically afford a nicer place if you spend your entire budget on one property. However, if you’re longing for that vacation vibe, a second home may be a better choice for you.

WHY CHOOSE A SECOND HOME?

Once reserved for the ultra-wealthy, second homes have become more mainstream. Home sales are surging in many resort and bedroom communities as city dwellers search for a place to escape the crowds and quarantine in comfort.5 And with air travel on hold for many families, some are channeling their vacation budgets into vacation homes that can be utilized throughout the year. 

A second home can also be a good option if you’re preparing for retirement. By purchasing your retirement home now, you can lock in a low interest rate, start paying down the mortgage, and begin enjoying the perks of retirement living while you’re still fit and active. Plus, it’s easier to qualify for a mortgage while you’re employed, although you may be charged a slightly higher interest rate than on a primary home loan.6

One advantage of choosing a second home is that you can offset a portion of the costs—and in some cases turn a profit—by renting it out on a platform like Airbnb or Vrbo. However, be sure to consult with a real estate professional or rental management company to get a realistic sense of the property’s true income potential.

WHICH ONE IS RIGHT FOR ME?

You may read this and think: I’d really like both a move-up home AND a second home! But if you’re dealing with a limited budget (aren’t we all?), you’ll probably need to make a choice.  These three tactics can help you decide which option is right for you.

1. Determine Your Time and Financial Budget


You may meet the bank’s qualifications to purchase a home, but do you have the time, energy, and financial resources to maintain it? This is an important question to ask yourself, no matter what type of home you choose.
Most buyers realize that a second home will mean double mortgages, utilities, taxes, and insurance. But consider all the extra time and expense that goes into maintaining two properties. Two lawns to mow. Two houses to clean. Two sets of systems and appliances that can malfunction. Second homes aren’t always a vacation. Make sure you’re prepared for the labor and carrying costs that go into maintaining another residence.
Of course, some move-up homes require more work than a second home. For example, if your move-up option is a major fixer-upper, you’ll probably invest more energy and capital than you would on a small vacation condo by the beach. Have an honest discussion about how much time and money you want to spend on your new property. Would a move-up home or a second home be a better fit given your parameters?

2.Rank Your Priorities

If you’re still undecided, make a wish list of the characteristics you’d like in your new home. Then rank each item from most to least important. This exercise can help you determine your “must-have” features—and which ones you may need to sacrifice or delay. Here’s a sample to help you get started:

FEATURE
Dedicated home office
Extra bedroom
Pool
Walk to the beach
Big backyard
Close to friends and family
Short commute to the office
Investment potential

3.Explore Your Options

Once you’ve determined your parameters and priorities, it’s time to begin your home search. 

If you’re still not sure whether a move-up home or a second home is right for you, we can help.

Contact us to schedule a free consultation. We’ll discuss your options and help you assess the pros and cons of each, given your unique circumstances. 

We can also send you property listings for both move-up homes and second homes within your budget so you can better envision each scenario. Sometimes, viewing listings of homes that meet your criteria can make the decision clear.

LET’S GET MOVING

Whether you’re ready to make a move or need help weighing your options, we’d love to help. We can determine your current home’s value and show you local properties that fit within your budget. Or, if your heart is set on a second home in another market, we can refer you to an agent in your dream locale. Contact us today to schedule a free, no-obligation consultation!

Sources:

  1. Zillow –
    https://www.zillow.com/research/coronavirus-remote-work-suburbs-27046/ 
  2. The Harris Poll –
    https://theharrispoll.com/should-you-flee-your-city-almost-40-have-considered-it-during-the-pandemic/
  3. MarketWatch –
    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/mortgage-rates-keeping-falling-so-will-they-finally-drop-to-0-2020-08-13
  4. Toronto Star –
    https://www.thestar.com/business/2020/08/07/you-can-get-a-fixed-rate-as-low-as-184-per-cent-which-is-unbelievable-low-mortgage-rates-driving-up-home-prices.html
  5. Kiplinger –
    https://www.kiplinger.com/real-estate/buying-a-home/601091/timely-reasons-to-buy-a-vacation-home
  6. The Press-Enterprise –
    https://www.pe.com/2018/11/17/5-tips-on-when-should-you-buy-a-retirement-house-hint-before-you-quit-work/

These 4 Negotiating Tips Can Help You Sell for Top Dollar

Receiving your first offer is one of the most exciting parts of selling your home. And while it might seem like the hard work is finally over, the negotiation process is actually just getting started. 

Even in a seller’s market, negotiating with a buyer can require quite a bit of time, skill, and guidance from your agent. However, with the right strategies, you can remain in the driver’s seat and maximize your profits.

Here’s How to Negotiate with Potential Buyers

When buyers submit an offer, they’re trying to get the best possible price, secure specific contingencies and financing, and close on their ideal timeline. As a seller, you’ll want to take their needs into consideration—but that doesn’t mean you have to give in to every concession.

Ready to hone your negotiation skills? Here are four easy tips to help you leverage a deal that gets you the price you want while keeping your buyer happy.

Review every offer with your agent

Agent helping with a contract

Even if you have some home selling experience, it can be hard to decipher all the elements of an offer. Most offers are just a small part of a purchase and sale agreement, which includes everything from price to contingencies to deadlines, so it’s important to review every detail with your agent.

While it might be tempting to decline any offers below your asking price, you still want to consider the bigger picture. It may be worth sacrificing some equity for fewer contingencies or a cash deal. Your agent can guide you through the pros and cons of each offer, as well as answer any questions.

Don’t compromise on your must-haves

Talking at a table

Fortunately, low inventory and rising prices have given sellers a distinct advantage in today’s market. That means you probably won’t have to give up a lot of your must-haves—like a certain price or closing date—to secure your sale. 

While it’s okay to drive a hard bargain, you don’t want to appear unreasonable to buyers. In some situations, it’s common courtesy to agree to certain contingencies (such as a home inspection), offer credits for repairs, or even pay a portion of their closing costs.

Make a clear counteroffer

Making an offer

If you receive an offer that isn’t quite what you want, you have a few options. Most sellers choose to respond with a counteroffer, which proposes modified terms that are more beneficial to them. 

The biggest factor to consider is price—if a buyer offers less than you’re willing to accept, try countering with a more realistic number. However, you’ll also want to take financing, contingencies, and timing into account. For example, you may want to ask a buyer for a different closing date or say no to excessive contingencies, as they can slow down the transaction. Ultimately, the ball is in your court, so it’s worth weighing different options with your agent.

Don’t be afraid to say no

Signing paperwork

Generally, you should always submit a counteroffer to every reasonable offer. However, if it becomes clear that a buyer isn’t willing to budge on your deal-breakers, don’t be afraid to say no. It’s also best to automatically decline any lowball offers that are around 30% less than your list price.

While it may seem counterintuitive to turn down an offer, it’s not worth negotiating with someone who isn’t serious about your home. And because the market is extremely competitive right now, it probably won’t take long to find a buyer who’s willing to pay the right price.

Thinking of Selling Your Home Soon?

If you’re looking for the right agent to guide you through the negotiation process, we’d love to lend a helping hand! Get in touch with us today to learn the ins and outs of selling your home—we’re always on hand to answer any questions you might have.

Buyer Beware: 6 Red Flags That Could Spell Trouble for Homebuyers

Picture this: you’ve found a seemingly perfect home in just the right neighborhood. It has every single one of your must-haves, plenty of space, and even all of the features you want. But on the tour, your agent spots a few big problems, like a crack in the foundation or signs of water damage. Should you walk away from what seems like your dream house?

Unless you’re looking to tackle a fixer-upper, you may want to proceed with caution if you run into any of these red flags during a showing.

Watch Out for These 6 Red Flags During a Showing

As you tour homes, it’s important to remember that a seller may not always disclose (or know) the whole truth about their house. If you ever have any questions about a home’s condition, make sure to ask your agent. They’ll often be able to spot problems that you may not see yourself, and they can also help you decide whether or not a certain issue is a dealbreaker. 

And even though a property may appear well-maintained, there could be some lingering imperfections that aren’t visible to an untrained eye—here are a few examples.

Foundation issues

Foundation crack

A faulty foundation is one of the biggest and costliest problems you can encounter in a home. If you spot any foundation cracks (both outside or inside) bigger than one third of an inch, it could mean a property has major structural defects.

Other signs of potential foundation issues include sticking doors, gaps around window frames, or sagging floors.

Outdated electric and plumbing systems

Tools and electrical supplies

A leaky faucet or ungrounded outlet may seem like a quick fix, but they could signal a much larger problem. If you’re touring an older home, have your agent ask about the age of the plumbing and electrical wiring. It’s essential (and expensive) to bring these systems up to code to prevent potential floods or fires.

An old roof

Old roof shingles

Typically, roofs should be replaced every 12 to 15 years. So if you notice some missing or curling shingles, it could mean that a home’s roof has reached the end of its lifespan. If you’re not sure about a roof’s age, be sure to ask your agent—they can get in touch with the seller’s agent for more information.

Water damage

Water damage on a ceiling

Take a look at a home’s ceiling and floors—do you see any dark spots? If so, this could be a sign of water damage, which is often a pricey fix. Be sure to check out a home’s drainage situation, too. A yard that isn’t properly graded could cause water to seep inside after a heavy rainstorm.

Homes that have basements are more prone to leaks than those that don’t, so don’t forget to head downstairs to look for water damage!

Unwelcome critters

Mouse trap

Bugs, mice, and other pests can spell big trouble for a house, especially if the infestation is widespread. Termites in particular should be a huge red flag, as they can destroy a home’s entire structure before being detected.

If you see an overwhelming number of critters wandering around during your tour, you may want to move on right away. You should also check for mud tubes, hollow or rotting wood, and bug droppings, as these are common indications of termites.

Unpleasant odors

Spraying air freshener

Notice a less-than-pleasant scent during a showing? These aromas could be signs of mold, mildew, water damage, pests, improper ventilation, and countless other issues. You should also be wary if a seller seems to be covering up smells with heavily scented candles or air fresheners.

Bottom line: Always have a home inspection

Home inspection report

Even if you don’t spot any of these problems, it’s always best to have an inspection after your offer is accepted. A qualified inspector can spot problems both large and small and will provide a detailed report of everything that needs to be fixed.

From there, you can try to renegotiate the price of the home with the seller or ask them to complete the repairs. However, if a home is being sold “as-is,” you may be stuck doing the work yourself. 

Thinking About Buying Your Next Home?

When it comes to finding the right home, it pays to have an expert agent on your side to handle all the details. Give us a call today to learn more about the premier services we offer to our buyers. We’d be more than happy to answer any of your real estate questions, and we can also help you sell your current home, too!

How to Handle Getting Multiple Offers on Your Home

If you’re thinking about listing your home, you’ve probably heard that we’re in a seller’s market right now. As inventory dwindles and buyer interest intensifies, it’s not uncommon to see properties sell just hours after they’re listed, sometimes even tens of thousands above their original asking price.

This may seem like an ideal scenario, but navigating a multi-offer situation can be difficult for even the most seasoned sellers. And sometimes, selecting the right offer doesn’t always mean going with the highest bidder.

Your Guide to Choosing the Right Offer

As a seller, you’ll quickly find that not all offers are created equal. In addition to price, there are a few other factors you should consider, such as contingencies, financing, closing dates, and plenty of other extras that buyers can attach to an offer. 

Feeling a little overwhelmed? This advice can help you streamline, and get the most out of, your home sale.

Keep your agent in the loop

Talking with an agent

First and foremost, you’ll want to include your agent in every step of the negotiation process. They’ll be the main point of contact between you and a buyer’s agent, but they can also talk you through your options and help you decide which offer best suits your needs. Additionally, your agent can educate you on common contingencies, as well as other terms that are often added to an offer (more on that later!).

Compare contingencies and financing

Hand holding cash

Aside from price, you should look at the contingencies and financing options included within any offers you receive. Contingencies are conditions that must be met before a sale—common examples are home inspections, appraisals, and loan approval. As a seller, you want to see as few contingencies as possible, as they can make it harder to close the deal.

Additionally, it’s important to consider how a buyer will be paying for your home. Cash offers are usually considered the best, as you won’t have to deal with appraisals or lenders. There’s also no chance of losing the sale if the buyer’s loan application doesn’t get approved. If you’re looking to close fast, it may even be worth accepting a lower offer if it’s in cash.

Consider any extras

Signing a contract

In a hot market, some buyers will do anything to stand out against the competition. However, before you fall for any seemingly enticing offers, you’ll want to know which terms will actually benefit you as a seller. 

It’s almost always worth giving special consideration to pre-approved buyers, because they’ve taken an extra step to secure their financing ahead of time. Buyers who want to close quickly, pay any closing costs, or even set an escalation clause to outbid other offers may also be more serious candidates.

Remember your home’s value

Money house

If you end up receiving quite a few offers on your home, you might even find yourself in a bidding war. This can drive the price up quite substantially, but you should probably think twice before accepting the highest bid.

If a buyer is financing their purchase, your home will likely need to pass an appraisal before the sale. And if the price was inflated in a bidding war, a bank may not approve the buyer for the full amount of their loan, which could jeopardize the deal. Be sure to keep your home’s value in mind as you review offers with your agent. They can help you filter out any outlandish bids while still maximizing your profit.

Gearing Up to Sell Soon?

Selling a home doesn’t have to be a stressful process—at least not when you work with a top-rated local agent! Feel free to give us a call and let us know how we can help with any of your real estate needs. We have the resources and expertise to get your house sold quickly and for top dollar!

A Pet Lover’s Guide to Buying a Home

If you have dogs, cats, or other pets in your home, you probably consider them to be part of your family. And if you’re thinking about making a move soon, that means you’ll want to take their needs into consideration, too. Here’s our ultimate guide to finding the perfect place you and your furry friend will love!

The 4 Factors to Consider When Buying a Home with Pets

According to a recent survey by CNBC, 79% of pet owners who recently purchased a home said they would have passed up a seemingly perfect property if it didn’t fit their pets’ needs. So it’s no surprise that pet-friendly features—like large, fenced-in yards and proximity to parks—are now in high demand with today’s buyers.

Are you searching for a home with Fluffy or Fido in tow? If so, here are four factors you should consider before making a move.

Local Pet Laws

Dog in the grass

Believe it or not, every state, county, town, and even some neighborhoods have specific rules about pets, so you’ll need to read up on any local laws before committing to a home. You’ll often find regulations regarding pet types, breeds, vaccinations, and leash requirements.

If you choose to move to a condo or community with a homeowners association, pet restrictions may be a bit tighter. Some neighborhoods place limits on the number of pets allowed per residence, and they often have noise ordinances to curtail more boisterous animals. If you have any questions about what is and isn’t allowed, don’t be afraid to ask your agent or the HOA for more information.

The Neighborhood

Cat in the grass

Choosing a location is one of the most important parts of the home buying process, especially if you have a pet. Some neighborhoods are more pet-friendly than others and may even have special amenities for four-legged residents, so you’ll want to spend some time scoping out the area to see what’s around.

If you have a dog, consider moving to a community with plenty of sidewalks or a nearby park. You may also want to steer clear of busy streets, especially if your pet likes to sneak out on unchaperoned adventures. Don’t forget to track down the closest pet supply stores and veterinarians, too!

Outdoor Spaces

Puppy running in grass

For most pet owners, having a large, fenced-in yard is a must if your furry friend loves to spend time outside. However, you’ll want to be sure that your outdoor space offers more than just room to roam. Make note of any potential safety risks, like poisonous plants, water features, and holes in or under the fence. If the house next door also has animals, confirm that they won’t be a hazard to your pets.

If a home doesn’t already have a fence, you may need to factor that cost into your budget. Some neighborhoods have restrictions on fences (or don’t allow them at all), so do your research first!

Interior Features

Cats looking out the window

When it comes to finding a new place for you and your pets, the inside matters just as much as the outside. As you tour a potential home, start by taking a look at the floors—hardwoods usually fare better with pets, as they’re easier to clean and restain. You’ll also want to ensure that your new home has ample room for all of your pets, as well as their litter boxes, toys, and crates. Bonus points if a space has some pet-approved upgrades, like doggie doors or built-in feeding stations!

If you plan on staying in your next home for more than a few years, consider your pets’ changing needs as they age. Common features like stairs or a closed-in floorplan can become obstacles for older animals, but if your pet has specific needs, you may be able to make accommodations.

Making a Move with Your Pets?

Buying a home with pets doesn’t have to be hard if you work with the right agent! Contact our team today to learn more about making a move with Fluffy and Fido. We’d love to help you find a place that suits you and your companions’ needs!

15 Home Selling Terms to Add to Your Vocabulary

Even if you’ve sold a home before, deciphering real estate jargon can still seem impossible. There’s a lot of unique terminology you should know if you want to make the most of your sale, which means it’s crucial to be well-versed in some of the most common home selling terms before you list. If you’re still confused by contingencies or trying to decode disclosures, our glossary of real estate terms is here to get you on track.

15 Home Selling Terms, Explained

Here’s our A to Z list of the most important home selling vocab every seller should be familiar with. If you don’t see a specific term listed here, feel free to give us a call—we’d love to answer your questions!

Appraisal

House with coin stacks

The estimated market value of your property. Oftentimes a buyer will need to have a home appraised in order to secure financing.

As-Is

Listing a home “as-is” means that you’re selling it in its current state. This term tells buyers that you aren’t willing to make any changes or take money off the price—they will be responsible for handling all repairs.

Closing Costs

Calculating closing costs

This blanket term describes all the extra fees that come with closing on a home, which are usually deducted from the profit you make on the sale. Common closing costs include agent commissions (for you and the buyer), title fees, loan payoff costs, and any outstanding taxes or expenses.

Commission

This is what you’ll pay your agent (and the buyer’s agent) for their services. Commission is often negotiable and tends to be 5 to 6% of a home’s sale price, with around 3% going to each agent. 

Comparative Market Analysis

House figure on top of a calculator

Often abbreviated as CMA, this detailed evaluation of your home’s value is based on similar properties that have recently sold in your neighborhood.

Contingency

A contingency is a certain condition that must be met before a home is sold. If a contingency is not met, the buyer or seller can exit the deal, typically with no penalties. Financing, home inspections, and appraisals are just a few common contingencies.

Disclosures

Signing paperwork

Disclosures refer to any specific defects in a home that you’re legally obligated to share with a buyer. Required disclosures vary from state to state and even town to town, but your agent should be familiar with the most common types in your area.  

Earnest Money

This is a security deposit submitted by a buyer after they’ve put in an offer to show that they’re serious about purchasing your home. The money is typically applied towards their closing costs if the sale moves forward. 

Escrow

Agent chatting about an escrow account

An escrow account is normally set up by a lender to hold earnest money until the sale of a home. However, escrow accounts can also be used by lenders to hold real estate taxes and insurance premiums as you pay off your mortgage.

For Sale by Owner

Sometimes abbreviated as FSBO, this is when a homeowner tries to sell their property without the help of an agent, usually to avoid paying commission.

Real Estate Agent

Real estate agent helping a client

A real estate agent is someone who has passed a real estate exam and possesses a license that allows them to buy or sell homes in a specific area.

Real Estate Broker

Real estate brokers are agents who have received additional education, passed a broker exam, and completed a certain number of transactions. Most agents work under the supervision of a broker.

Realtor®

Realtors talking to each other

A Realtor® is an agent or broker who is a member of the National Association of Realtors. Realtors® are required to follow a strict code of ethics and pay annual membership dues.

Staging

Staging is the process of styling and updating your home for potential buyers. It can involve cleaning, repainting, decluttering, making repairs, and moving around furniture to make your space look its best. 

Under Contract

Under contract sign

When a home is under contract, the seller has accepted an offer from a buyer, and that buyer has the exclusive right to purchase the property.

Thinking About Selling Soon?

If you’re getting ready to list your home, we can help you navigate every step of the process. Just reach out to us to learn more about the services we offer to our sellers, and let us know if you have any questions. We’d be happy to lend you our expertise! 

The Pros and Cons of Living in a Neighborhood with an HOA

As you search for your next home, you’ll probably encounter more than a few neighborhoods that have their own homeowners associations. Often abbreviated as HOAs, these groups usually consist of a few elected residents, although they may also be run by an outside management company or developer.

While they tend to get a bad rap, HOAs actually have quite a few benefits you might not have considered—but they aren’t always the right fit for everyone.

Should You Buy in a Neighborhood with an HOA?

In a nutshell, an HOA’s job is to act as a governing body for a neighborhood. They typically set rules, maintain the community, and may offer certain amenities, like pools or landscaping. However, these perks don’t come free—homeowners have to pay dues to cover an HOA’s services.

Not sure if you want to live in a community with a homeowners association? Here are a few pros and cons to keep in mind before making a move.

Pro: Increased resale value

Neighborhood with an HOA

Believe it or not, an HOA can significantly impact a home’s resale value when you move again. On average, single family homes that are part of a local association sell for 4% more than ones that aren’t—for a home worth $300,000, that’s a gain of $12,000.

Con: More rules to follow

Side view of a home

Perhaps the biggest gripe that many homeowners have about HOAs is having to follow certain rules, especially when it comes to your home’s appearance. In order to maintain property values and a uniform look to the neighborhood, HOAs often restrict personalizations like paint colors, fences, or landscaping.

Associations may also have certain limitations on pets, noise, yard signs, home improvements, or trash removal. Violating the rules can sometimes result in hefty fines, so be sure you read up on an HOA’s restrictions to avoid any penalties.

Pro: A beautiful neighborhood

A pretty community

All those rules may seem irksome, but they do serve a purpose. HOA regulations are designed to make your neighborhood a beautiful and desirable place to live. You’ll never have to deal with eyesores like an overgrown lawn or lingering litter anymore, either!

Con: Additional fees

Paying HOA dues

Most associations charge dues that vary depending on the services and amenities they provide. It’s not uncommon to see fees of over $1,000 per year—definitely an expense you’ll want to factor into your monthly budget.

Wondering what these dues cover? They usually go towards maintenance, an emergency fund, or amenities. If you live in a condo or active adult community, they can also cover utilities and exterior maintenance.

Pro: Extra amenities 

Community pool

If you want to live somewhere with plenty of amenities right at your doorstep, an HOA neighborhood may be a great fit. Many homeowners associations pay to maintain community pools, tennis courts, playgrounds, and much more. Larger subdivisions may even have their own golf courses, restaurants, or clubhouses that are for residents only! 

Con: Risks of poor management

Woman stressed by an HOA

Almost every HOA is governed by residents, sometimes with the help of a management company. Unfortunately, a poorly managed association can be a nightmare for homeowners, especially if the HOA is responsible for maintaining major aspects of the community.

Homeowners associations also have the authority to increase dues without warning—and if they don’t have the money to pay for a big expense, they may even order a special assessment to cover the costs.

Bottom Line: Do your research!

In a recent survey by the Community Associations Institute, a whopping 85% of homeowners said they had a positive experience living in a community with an HOA. However, it’s still crucial to consider your own individual circumstances before making a decision. 

Be sure to read an association’s rules or bylaws, and take a good look at the neighborhood before you buy. If you have any questions, just ask your agent!

Take Your Next Steps

If you’re ready to make a move, we’d love to guide you through every step of the buying process! Just get in touch with us today to get started—we look forward to teaming up and helping you find your next dream home.

Keep Your Home Ready to Show with These 4 Tips

As a seller, you have to be able to get your home looking fantastic at the drop of a dime if an interested buyer schedules a tour. And unless you have the time to constantly clean, keeping your space prepped for showings might seem like an endless (and stressful!) ordeal. Luckily, we have a few tips that can help you avoid any pre-showing panicking.

The Easiest Ways to Stay Ready for Showings

The biggest secret to keeping your home ready for buyers is to do most of the work ahead of time. It might be tempting to put off cleaning or wait until the last minute to add your finishing touches, but all that procrastinating can easily backfire right before a showing! Here are some easy ways to keep your home looking spotless at all times…without any added headaches.

Declutter and reorganize

Decluttering a living room

Before you even think about listing, take some time to declutter and reorganize your belongings. This can help decrease the amount of stuff you have to put away before a showing, as well as reduce how much you’ll pack when you inevitably move. Remember, you want buyers to focus on the best parts of your home, not your clutter.

Not sure where to start? Try sorting your possessions in “keep,” “donate,” and “throw away” piles so you can narrow down what you really need. And if you have items that don’t get used every day that you’d like to keep, you can always rent a storage unit until you move into your new place.

Do an initial deep clean

Cleaning a kitchen

After you’ve thoroughly decluttered, you’ll want to do a thorough cleaning of every single room in your home, including your closets. It might seem like a lot of work at first, but it’ll be worth it when you don’t have to completely scrub down your house each time a buyer comes knocking on your door. Don’t shy away from getting into every nook and cranny—you want everything to look perfect!

Many professionals recommend using the top-to-bottom and left-to-right rule. That means starting by cleaning things up high, such as ceiling fans and bookshelves, and ending with your floors and carpets. Going from left to right can also keep you on task and make the entire process go by much faster.

Have a routine for tidying up

Making a bed

Let’s be honest—if you have kids, pets, or actually live in your home, it’s not easy to keep it looking like a showroom at all times. Establishing a regular tidying routine can help you maintain that initial deep clean you did before listing. Assigning tasks—like making beds or vacuuming the floors—to everyone in your household also allows you to divide and conquer! 

To minimize the amount of cleaning you have to do, consider keeping some rooms that you don’t use off limits. You can even designate a certain area, such as an ottoman or a storage bin under a bed, for everyday clutter that needs to be hidden right before a showing.

Create an escape plan

Family on a walk

Keeping your home ready for showings is only half of the battle—you also need to know where you and your household will be going before the buyers show up! Not every tour is conveniently timed, so you’ll want to have a few options in place for different times and days of the week. If you have kids or pets, don’t forget to make arrangements to accommodate their needs, too.

Don’t know where to go? Try using your time to run errands or plan some fun (and practical) outings with your kids, like an outdoor study session or afternoon at the pool. Your furry friend can also be included in the fun—just head to a pet-friendly park for a little sunshine and fresh air!

Want to Get Top Dollar and Sell Fast?

Selling your home might seem difficult, but working with the right agent can make all the difference! We’re ready to help you navigate every step of the selling process, so just give us a call to see what we can do for you.

Spring, Summer, Fall, or Winter: Which Home Buying Season Is Best?

You’ve probably heard that spring and summer are the best seasons for home buying. After all, there’s more inventory on the market, and the warm weather is ideal for showings. However, the ongoing global health crisis has shattered the idea of the “peak home buying season” and left many potential buyers wondering if now is still the right time to make a move.

The Merits (and Downsides) of Buying a Home During Each Season

Most real estate markets fluctuate from month to month, as do prices and inventory. Before you decide when to buy, it’s important to weigh the pros and cons of each season and ask a local agent about trends in your area. Here are a few benefits of buying during every season…as well as a few drawbacks.  

Spring: Gorgeous homes, but higher prices

House with landscaping

Traditionally, spring is one of the hottest seasons for home buying, and it’s easy to see why. As temperatures thaw out in March, April, and May, the number of new listings seems to multiply every day. Homes also tend to look their best during spring—after all, who doesn’t love blossoming flowers or lush landscaping after a long winter?

Although you’ll have more inventory to choose from during these warmer months, you won’t be the only one searching for a home. Spring buyers usually have to face more competition, which can result in inflated prices and bidding wars. If you’re getting ready to buy during spring, be prepared to make a quick offer and don’t expect many concessions from sellers.

Summer: Lots of listings, but more competition

Aerial shot of a neighborhood

Summer is another extremely popular home buying season, especially for households with children. Many sellers also decide to list during June, July, or August, which means you’ll benefit from an even broader selection of houses. To top it all off, you can even schedule evening showings as the days get longer.

Unfortunately, summer home buying often comes with problems similar to spring: tons of buyers, higher prices, more bidding wars, and less time to make a decision. And if you wait until July or August, you could actually see a dip in inventory as sellers go on vacation!

Fall: Motivated sellers, but inventory could dwindle

House in autumn

There’s so much to love about autumn: the falling leaves, the cooler temperatures…and the fantastic home prices. Fall is easily one of the most underrated times to buy a house, since you can take advantage of strong inventory, less competition, and lower prices. Many sellers will also be more motivated to make a deal, particularly if they weren’t able to attract buyers during the summer. 

As you plan your autumnal move, it’s crucial to time it just right. It’s not uncommon to see a slight dip in inventory at the beginning of a new school year, which is usually around late August or early September. If you wait until late October or November, sellers might also start pulling their homes from the market due to the impending holidays. 

Winter: Less competition, but fewer choices

Houses in winter

Historically, winter is the slowest season for real estate—but that shouldn’t deter you from starting your home search in December, January, or February. The most obvious benefit of winter buying is decreased competition, which often leads to some of the lowest prices of the year. Real estate agents will also have fewer clients during the colder months, so they can spend much more time helping you. 

Of course, buying in the middle of winter also comes with some challenges. It can be difficult to plan a closing around everyone’s schedules during the busy holiday season. Diminished inventory also means there are fewer listings to choose from, so your search may take a bit longer than expected.

Need Help Planning Your Move?

Whether you choose to move in spring, summer, fall, or winter, you can trust us to help you navigate every aspect of the buying process! Just give us a call today to learn more about our home buying resources, and let us know when you’re ready to take your next steps.

8 Simple Ways to Get Your Outdoor Spaces Ready for Summer

The weather’s getting warmer, summer is (finally!) just around the corner, and we’re all staying at home more than ever before. If you plan on spending your days relaxing in nature, now is the perfect time to give your outdoor space a little upgrade. And if you’re thinking about selling soon, you might even impress some summer buyers, too.

These Easy Projects Can Totally Transform Your Outdoor Space

You don’t have to spend a lot of money or time to get your outdoor space looking stellar. Here are eight quick, cost-effective DIY projects to help usher your yard, patio, porch, or balcony into the new season. 

Do a little tidying

Gardening supplies

Did you forget to do your spring cleaning? Before you start on any big projects, take some time to tidy up your outdoor spaces. Sweep away any dust on your balcony, patio, or deck, and clean off your furniture. If you have a yard, be sure to clear out any lingering debris, trim back your trees or shrubs, and uproot any pesky patches of weeds.

Perform regular maintenance

Late spring is the perfect time to tackle that maintenance to-do list you’ve been putting off! Although these routine tasks might seem mundane, they’re essential to keeping your outdoor space in tip-top shape. Cleaning out your gutters, spraying for bugs and pests, and powerwashing are just a few common projects that you’ll want to handle before the weather gets too hot. 

Give your lawn some extra attention

Mowing the lawn

There are a few steps you should be taking right now if you want to keep your lawn green all summer long. Aerating and fertilizing during late spring is key to keeping your yard healthy. When you start mowing, be sure to not cut more than one third of the grass height in one sitting. You can prevent this by increasing the blade height on your mower.

Add new landscaping

You don’t have to be a professional landscaper to add some new greenery to your outdoor space—but be sure to do some research before you start planting. Try to select flowers, shrubs, or trees that do well in your area, and consider how much sunlight they’ll get throughout the day. If you have a balcony or patio, incorporating a few potted plants can add a fun (and low-maintenance) splash of color.

Plant a garden

Raised garden bed

Have you always wanted to harvest your own fruits, vegetables, or herbs? Raised plant beds make it easy to create a garden just about anywhere, and they’re an easy DIY project that you can tackle before the summer months. Just build or buy the beds, fill them with soil, pick your plants, and start growing!

Invest in some outdoor furniture

Good patio furniture offers both comfort and function, and just a few updates can transform your outdoor space into a whole new living area. Consider investing in some staple pieces, like a table and chairs or a loveseat, depending on the size of your deck or patio. Many retailers will even ship the furniture straight to your front door. 

Incorporate new lighting

Outdoor string lights

If you want to take advantage of your outdoor space during the day and at night, new lighting might just do the trick. You don’t have to get too fancy (unless you want to!)—simply replacing some fixtures or hanging a strand of trendy string lights will elevate the entire area. If you really want to beat the heat, you might even install an outdoor ceiling fan on your covered patio or deck.

Getting Ready to Buy or Sell This Summer?

Whether you’re thinking about moving next week, next month, or next year, you can trust us to help you navigate every step of the process. We have plenty of buying and selling resources to get you started, so feel free to reach out if you have any questions. We’re always on hand to lend our expertise!